Internal Service

I am pleased to have had the opportunity to contribute to the College, to the community, and to my profession through service activities. My service activities are extremely important to me personally, and although I became an assistant professor anticipating that my professional connections and relationships would serve to facilitate opportunities within the realm of service activities, I did not anticipate the joy I have experienced with my service. I have found my involvement with the Department or the SOE, the College, and at the national and international levels of service to be extremely rewarding and exciting. Artifacts are embedded as hyperlinks within these descriptions.

Service to the Department or the SOE
Attendance at, and participation in, departmental or SOE and program area meetings.
EMU.With regard to department-level service at EMU, I have worked hard to become a valued member of the Department of Teacher Education and to make significant and meaningful contributions to the Educational Psychology Program. In pursuit of this goal, I attended all Program and Department Meetings and retreats, except when professional travel prevented me from doing so. Sample documentation of my attendance and active involvement will be found in the minutes of the Educational Psychology Program Meetings. The minutes of the Teacher Education Department are available from the Department Secretary at EMU.
W&M.
With regard to SOE-level service at W&M, I served the SOE as a faculty secretary. I have participated actively in the School Psychology and Counselor Education (SPACE) meetings and have learned a great deal about the required and elective courses within each SPACE program, as well as the characteristics of the students, counseling students’ license requirements, etc (SPACE Meeting Minutes). I also participated in the Curriculum and Instruction (C & I [Letter]) meeting for reviewing students in the teacher certification program after I finished teaching C & I students during the Summer 2009 semester.


Membership in departmental standing or ad hoc committees.
EMU.I served on a variety of department committees including the Human Subjects Committee, Diversity Committee, and Finance Committee during my time at EMU (Committee List). Human Subjects Committee. I served as a member of the Human Subjects Committee, which was responsible for clarifying procedures for student research proposals, reconfiguring the Human Subject Research (HSR) submission procedures and reviewing HSR applications for the College of Education Human Subjects Committee on an as-needed basis (Letter).

Diversity Committee. The committee was responsible for recruiting and retaining more ethnic, economic, cultural, linguistic, and sexual orientation minority students for the Department of Teacher Education. Additional documentation of my involvement is available upon request (Letter).


Finance Committee. The committee was responsible for handling financial issues within the Department of Teacher Education. My role on the committee included participating in budgetary discussions as the providing input on fiscal constraints and the need to develop a strategy accomplish more with less. Additional documentation of my involvement is available upon request.


W&M.Since coming to WM, I served as a faculty secretary the SOE meetings (2008-2009), as a committee member for the Academic Affairs Committee (Letter), and as a group member for the Focus Group for Greening the SOE (Letter).




Academic Affairs Committee.


The Academic Affairs Committee addresses issues that enhance the quality of the education in the SOE in the academic arena. The Committee's duties include researching academic policies and procedures of peer institutions that are beneficial to students, formulating ways to further enhance the SOE’s own academic policies, and lobbying of administrators to make these changes. This may include policy relating to curricular, exams, withdrawals, grading, auditing, pass/fail credits, class registration, addition of majors, minors, and certificates, scholarship and award availability and awareness, and any other concerns of the students relating to the academic policies of the SOE.


Assisting colleagues and students in various activities within the department or the SOE.
EMU.

I worked with my EDPS colleagues to institute an annual student gathering during the winter semester to develop collegial relations between students and faculty, to inform students of upcoming courses, and to elicit student feedback on how to better support their learning goals. At the 2005 gathering, I presented an introduction to creative education to the EDPS faculty and graduate students (Presentation). I hosted the 2007 student gathering in my home (Letter). We introduced new faculty and new students at the meeting and shared information related to the revised EDPS graduate program course sequences and also exchanged personal experiences relating to the program (Letter). I also worked with my EDPS colleagues to develop a three-year schedule of EDPS graduate courses to assist with writing programs of study, creating EDPS Student Handbook on admittance and completion of the EDPS Masters programs. I also worked with my EDPS colleagues on the EDPS Program Advisory Board Meeting (Meeting Minutes), which was attended by EDPS faculty members and professionals from K-12 education in the surrounding South East Michigan area.

W&M.
Academic Affair Committee. I am a member of the Academic Affair Committee for the SOE, as a representative of the SPACE (**//Faculty Committee Lists 2010_11//**).

SPACE. I attended the 2009 and 2010 VACES Graduate Student Conference of the Virginia Counselors Association in February 2009 and 2010 (VACES Bulletin). While there, I attended the sessions that W&M counseling students presented and gave constructive feedback regarding how to improve the presenters’ research study. At the general meeting session, I introduced myself as a new assistant professor at W&M who would like to become involved in assisting counseling graduate students with various research studies. I also met several professors with other counseling programs in the state of Virginia and learned about characteristics of these programs at other universities.
In February 2009, I worked as an admission committee member for the school counseling program with Dr. Smith and Dr. Brendel. I reviewed all of the thirty-one applications’ essays, career goal statements, work/volunteer experiences, reference letters, GRE (Verbal, Quantitative, Analytic, Essay) scores, GPA, etc. After reviewing each of the applicants’ files, we rated each category. Once completed, we presented the rankings of the total ratings as well as the wait and rejection lists to the SPACE faculty for final consideration (Letter).
In February 2010, I worked as an admission committee member for Ph.D. Counseling Education program with the faculty members in the Counseling program. I reviewed all of the candicates' essays, career goal statements, work/volunteer experiences, reference letters, GRE scores, GPA, etc. After reviewing each of the Ph.D. program candidates' files, we interviewed all of the the candidates separately and had meetings to discuss final decisions.

The Center for Gifted Education. I began working with the Center for Gifted Education (CFGE or the Center) almost immediately after arriving at W&M in August of 2008. Since then I have worked extensively with my colleagues at the Center, its staff, a number of graduate students, local gifted students and their parents on the associated issues below.

Working on Project Clarion. I have spent a great deal of my time assisting with Project Clarion -- a five-year scale-up Javits project in its fourth year of operation. Project Clarion targets low income, high ability learners and measure the effects of higher level, inquiry-based science curricula on their performance. Project Clarion involves approximately 3300 K-3 students from six schools. Students were assigned into experimental or control classes (N=115 total) on a random basis. My participation in project Clarion includes working on variety of issues, including, but not limited to:
1) Participating in Project Clarion’s monthly meetings regarding implementation and evaluation of the project (Clarion Meeting Minutes).
2) Providing advice on research and data analyses.
3) Providing advice on promoting creativity in the Project’s curriculum.
4) Demonstrating the application of various data analysis methods to the director of Project Clarion.

5) Analyzing the effectiveness of the Project Clarion using various measures to evaluate the participants’ longitudinal gains on the various test scores from Year I to Year III, which required revising, clarifying, and re-analyzing all three years of data sets.
6) Conducting hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analyses due to the fact that the hierarchical model considers the dependence among students within classrooms, which required modified data sets and the creation of additional data files.

7) Documenting and interpreting both the results I obtained from various analyses and the results obtained by various project members.

8) Co-authoring the following two manuscripts, which are currently under review:

Kim, K. H., VanTassel-Baska, J., Bracken, B. A., Feng, A., T. Stambaugh, T., & Bland. L. (under review). Project Clarion: Three years of science instruction in title I schools among K-Third grade students.
Bland, L., VanTassel-Baska, J., Bracken, B. A., Kim, K. H., Feng, & A., T. Stambaugh (in press). Assessing critical thinking in science at primary levels through the use of multiple performance-based measures. Gifted Child Quaterly.

9) Presenting (or planning to present) the following research studies to the American Educational Research Association conference and the National Association for Gifted Children conference:


Kim, K. H., Bland, L., VanTassel-Baska, J., & Bracken, B. (2010, November). Project Clarion: Assessing science reasoning and conceptual understanding in the primary grades using performance measures. Paper to be presented at the 57th Annual Convention of the National Association for Gifted Children, Atlanta, GA, November 11-14, 2010.

Kim, K. H., Cross, T., Laurence, C., Cross, J., & Miller, A. (2010, November). Direct and indirect effects of creativity and personality on suicidal ideation among honors college students. Paper to be presented at the 57th Annual Convention of the National Association for Gifted Children, Atlanta, GA, November 11-14, 2010.


Cross, T., Laurence, C., Cross, J., Miller, A., & Kim, K. H., (2010, November). Direct and indirect effects of Goal orientation and social coping skills on suicidal ideation among honors college students. Paper to be presented at the 57th Annual Convention of the National Association for Gifted Children, Atlanta, GA, November 11-14, 2010.

Kim, K. H., VanTassel-Baska, J., Bracken, B. A., & Bland, L. (2010, April). Project Clarion: New science curriculum for K-third grade students in Title I schools. Paper to be presented at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association in Denver, CO, April 3-May 4, 2010.

10) Reviewing Project Clarion’s curriculum lesson book: Invitation to Invent, and providing detailed feedback proposing revisions to infuse proven strategies for the enhancement of creativity in the Project’s participants by encouraging students to “think differently” or to create “out of the box” ideas – the basic tenets of creativity.


11) Finally, I have contributed to a number of new proposal submissions; primarily methodology sections, for future research grants for the CFGE to continue, or replace, Project Clarion when this 5 year project concludes.

Working on the TCT. The CFGE has developed the Test of Critical Thinking (TCT) to assess children’s critical thinking aptitude within seven life domains (social, affect, academic, competence, family, physical, and spiritual) using Paul’s model of critical thinking. I also participated in monthly meetings concerning the TCT. Subsequently, I analyzed various TCT data sets and drafted the results section of the TCT manual (TCT Manual).

Working on the PASTeL. The CFGE has developed the Perceptual Assessment of Science Teaching and Learning (PASTel) to assess educators’ attitudes toward teaching science and their students’ typical response to science instruction. I have participated in the monthly meetings for PASTel and drafted the creativity segment for the literature review section of the PASTel manual (PASTel Manual).

Dissertation Committee member. I have contributed to the CFGE by being a committee member of three doctoral students’ (Ms. Mihyeon Kim, Ms. Gayle Roege, & Mr. Anthony Washington) dissertations in the gifted program at W&M. I have helped the students with the data analysis and results sections of their dissertations. Ms. Kim has finished her dissertation, and the Title of her dissertation is “The Relationship between Thinking Style Differences and Career Decision-making for High Achieving Students.” Ms. Roege and Mr. Washington are currently working on their dissertations.

Presentation for the W&M faculty. I conducted a seminar for W&M faculty, staff, and graduate students to give them an overview of the strengths and weaknesses of American and Asian educational systems. During this, the audience and I explored future directions of American educational system (Presentation):

Kim, K. H. (2008, September [Flyer]). Critical issues in American and Asian education. The Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, September 26, 2008.

Book chapter for the festschrift. I have contributed to the monograph commemorating the festschrift of Dr. Joyce VanTassel-Baska upon receiving an invitation to write a chapter on the topic of creativity within the section on Creativity and Eminence (Chapter):


Kim, K. H. (2009a). Developing creativity in gifted and talented students. In B. MacFarlane & T. Stambaugh (Eds.), Leading change in gifted education: The festschrift of Dr. Joyce VanTassel-Baska (pp. 37-48). Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.

Presentation at NAGC. I presented a paper to honor Dr. Joyce VanTassel-baska's Contributions to Gifted Education at the NAGC in November, 2009:


Kim, K. H., et al. (2009, November [Letter]). Panel Honoring Dr. Joyce VanTassel-baska's Contributions to Gifted Education. Paper presented at the 56th Annual Convention of the National Association for Gifted Children in St. Louis, MO, November 5-8, 2009.

Working with parents. Many parents have asked me to share my expertise with respect to meeting their gifted and creative children’s intellectual and creative needs with e-mails, phone calls, and meetings at the CFGE. I have also conducted seminars for parents of gifted students on the subject of fostering their children’s creative potential at home, as one CFGE’s events for its Saturday and Summer Enrichment Program (for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math courses[Letter]):


Kim, K. H. (2010, February). What can we do to enable creative kids to turn potentially problematic into productive behavior? Saturday and Summer Enrichment Program (February 13, 2010 - March 27, 2010, 9:30AM - 12:30PM for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math courses). The Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, February 20, 2009.
Kim, K. H. (2009, March). How well do you kill your child’s creativity? Saturday Enrichment Program (February 14, 2009 - March 28, 2009, 9:30AM - 12:30PM for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math courses). The Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, March 7, 2009.

Working with teachers. I have met and shared my expertise with many local teachers regarding gifted students at the CFGE. As a result, I have been invited to appear as a featured guest speaker during a breakout session for the National Curriculum Network Conference (the majority of the audience is teachers) in March, 2010. The focus of my address was on how to recognize or identify creative students and how to encourage the development of environments that help students realize their creative potential (Letter):


Kim, K. H. (2010, March [Letter]). Featured Session: Do you kill your students’ creativity? The 15th National Curriculum Network Conference. The Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, March 11, 2010.


In addition, I will be presenting another session at the same conference regarding the identification of creativity and how to measure students’ creative potential using the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking, and how to score their responses on the TTCT:

Kim, K. H. (2010, March [Program]). Assessing creative potential. Pre-conference Workshop, The 15th National Curriculum Network Conference. The Center for Gifted Education, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, March 10, 2010.

Helping with developing creativity tests. I have shared my expertise in developing creativity tests with the curriculum director of the CFGE, who has been involved in developing criteria for identifying gifted students in Colorado. There are several different criteria for identification, and I have provided guidance for measuring domain specific creativity within Language Arts, Social studies, Mathematics, and Science (Letter).

Developing a workshop plan. I developed a workshop program for Korean teachers of gifted students in April, May, and June, 2009 (Letter), which is basically a continuation of the workshops I developed for the Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development at the University of Georgia. This workshop included educational trips, gifted program observations in local public schools, and various sessions and presentations regarding how to teach gifted students. This required the retention and coordination of two interpreters, several local teachers of gifted students, and several WM faculty members. I also developed a budget for the entire workshop and made hotel (Letter) and dining arrangements, and presenter (Letter) and school visit (Letter) arrangements for the Korean educators. However, due to the schedule conflicts among the Korean educators, Dr. VanTassel-Baska, and the Summer Enrichment Program, the workshop has been postponed until 2010.

Participating in social gatherings. Finally, in addition to my contributions to academic and professional development of the CFGE and its personnel, I have also actively participated in various social gatherings for the CFGE, including CFGE reception at the 2008 NAGC (November, 2008 [Flyer]); Thanksgiving dinner at a CFGE staff member’s home (November, 2008); a Christmas dinner at Dr. VanTassel-Baska’s home (December, 2008); the CFGE’s Holiday Pot Luck and end of the year party (December, 2008 [Letter]); Dr. VanTassel-Baska’s festschrift (March, 2009 [Program]); CFGE graduation lunch (May, 2009 [Letter]); Dr. VanTassel-Baska’s retirement party from the SOE (May, 2009); and Dr. VanTassel-Baska’s retirement party from the CFGE (June, 2009). These social gatherings, while seemingly unimportant, have been valuable to me because I have gotten to know CFGE’s personnel on both a professional and a personal basis, which has allowed me to think of them as family.
Services to the University EMU.
University Research and Sabbatical Leave Committee. I served on the University Research and Sabbatical Leave Committee. This committee was responsible for reviewing university-funded proposals, including faculty research fellowships and applications for sabbaticals. I had reviewed over seventy proposals
as a committee member until I left EMU. I also actively participated in the procedures for deciding which proposals should be funded by the University (Letter).

SOTL program. I worked on the Faculty-student partnerships in Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) investigations of the SOTL Program at EMU (Letter). As a part of this program, I conducted a research study for which a scholarship was awarded to support one of my graduate students. I also worked on an EMU faculty research fellowship.

Graduate Research Fair. I sponsored two graduate students' research projects at the 2008 Graduate Research Fair at EMU, in March 2008 (Letter). I also participated in the event as a faculty moderator (Letter). Subsequently, I critiqued the student's presentations and offered them feedback on how to improve their study designs and research methodology.



W&M.
Library Policy Advisory Committee. I am a member of the Library Policy Advisory Committee at W&M, as a representative of the SOE. The committee is charged to advise the libraries, president, provost and faculty on policy matters concerning campus libraries (Letter). The committee generally meets twice a semester (Letter).


Equal Opportunity Committee. I am a member of the Academic Affair Committee at W&M, as a representative of the SOE (Faculty Committee Lists 2010_11).

East Asian Studies Advisory Committee. I am also a member of the East Asian Studies Advisory Committee. The East Asian Studies program is a new initiative at W&M for coordinating the exploration of the cultures, history, and languages of East Asian countries (Letter). It takes an interdisciplinary approach, integrating several academic disciplines, including anthropology, economics, art history, government, history, language and literature, philosophy, and religion, in the study of East Asian countries. Besides attending regular (Letter) or social (Letter) meetings for the committee (Letter), I served on the Majors Fair at W&M in March, 2009, which introduced the East Asian Studies program to interested students who had yet to declare their major. I answered the students’ questions, relating to the program language requirements and the core classes for the major (two in History, one in Anthropology, one in Government, and one in Religion [Letter]).


Faculty Adviser for the KASA. I am the faculty adviser for the Korean American Students Association (KASA) at W&M (Letter). The KASA has about seventy Korean or Korean American students. Some of them have language barriers, some of them have cultural barriers, and some of them have both; thus, it is critical for them to receive support from faculty members at W&M. I have helped many Korean and Korean American students with deciding their curriculum , future career choices, application processes for Master’s or Ph.D. programs, employment, etc. I also helped with preparing the Chusok Show that represents the Harvest Festival in Korea, which is held annually during autumn. The show was intended to educate the campus of W&M with respect to the traditions that take place during the festival and many other aspects of the Korean culture, which are not well known to the American public. The audience was able to experience and learn about the cultural values of the Korean people, and the historical contexts that have made them who they are. After my opening comments and greetings to the audience, the show included modern and traditional dance performances by members of KASA, a Tae Kwon Do demonstration by the Tae Kwon Do club, a fashion show, and a NANTA performance (Korean "STOMP" percussion) also performed by KASA members. After the show, the KASA members and I provided the audience with Korean food, which had been donated by local Korean churches and restaurants (Letter).


A chapter for the LINK at W&M. In September 2009, some of the KASA members and I attended a film called “Liberty in North Korea” at the School of Law at W&M (Letter). The show was presented by the LINK, which is an organization that provides North Korean refugees with underground shelters and resettlement assistance. In February 2010, the LINK also presented another film at the School of Law at W&M (Letter). The main goal of the LINK is to help promote awareness about the North Korean crisis. The Asian Law Student Association at W&M and the International Law Society have been organizing a chapter for the LINK at W&M, and I have been asked and have accepted an invitation to serve as a faculty adviser for the chapter.