External Service


Service to the Local Community

EMU.
Guest speaker for Asian History classes in a local high school. In September, 2006, I received an invitation from a high school history teacher at Huron High School, to be a guest speaker. I was selected because of the research I have conducted on East Asian culture. The topic of my discussion focused on the influence of Confucianism on Asian culture (Presentation). I also shared my research interests and teaching experiences with the students. Some of them were interested in becoming professors themselves and asked me quite a few questions about what I do as a professor (Card).

Arranging a Korean delegation visit to American public schools. I organized the visit of a Korean research delegation to Ann Arbor in 2006, for the purpose of studying the nature of creativity in American public schools (Schedule). The delegation was comprised of one principal, fourteen elementary school teachers, and eleven middle and high school teachers. I made arrangements for them to observe classes in an elementary school, a middle school, and a high school. I was also responsible for arranging the entire trip, which included transportation (Letter)¸ accommodations, and city tours (Letter). Afterwards, the Korean government arranged a $700 thank-you gift for each of the schools they have visited. The following are some of the messages that I sent to the three schools to organize activities for the delegations:


Change in Korean Education: The Korean educators are visiting America because fostering creativity in gifted students has recently come to the forefront as an important element in the future of Korea's economic prosperity in the global economy. The Korean government passed a gifted education act in April of 2002 that initiated gifted education programs in elementary, middle, and high schools in Korea. Korean gifted education has focused primarily in the areas of mathematics and science. The mathematics and science education departments are highly interested in creativity because ingenuity in these fields is tied to fiscal prosperity and competition within the global economy. Because of this shift in focus, many educators have come to the United States for training in creative education.

Classroom Observations: First, we would like to do a classroom observation; preferably of a creative, hands-on, project- oriented teaching; not just lecture, reading, or writing. The incorporation of product-driven instruction that encourages the development of problem-solving skills and higher order thinking is one of the things that distinguish American education.
I helped the Korean delegation to visit K-12 Ann Arbor public schools: Michelle Elementary School (November 1, 2006 [Letter]), Scarlett Middle School ( [Letter] November 2, 2006 [Itinerary]), and Huron High School (November 3, 2006 [Letter]).



W&M.
Consulting with local parents of gifted or creative children. As I noted above for the CFGE, I have helped parents of gifted or creative children with matters relating to to how they can best meet their children’s intellectual or creative needs. I also conducted a seminar at the CFGE for parents of gifted students regarding how to foster their children’s creative potential at home. I am convinced that these kinds of service activities have a direct impact on influencing the lives of local gifted or creative students.

Consulting with local teachers of gifted students. I have met with a number of local teachers of gifted students at the CFGE and at local schools and have shared my knowledge of creativity with them. As I noted above, I have been scheduled to present the results of several research analyses to teachers of gifted students regarding how to recognize or identify creative students and how to encourage an environment that helps these students realize their creative potential in classrooms. Additionally, I will present some of my own research findings regarding how to measure students’ creative potential using the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking and how to score and interpret their responses on these tests. As I previously stated, I believe that the utilization of my expertise in providing these services does make a difference in the lives of local gifted and creative students.




Service to the National Community
Program Chair of the Research and Evaluation Network. I was the Assistant Program Chair for 2009-2010 and is the Program Chair for 2010-2012 for the Research and Evaluation Network, which is an association for the researchers’ group for the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC [Letter]).

Membership Committee Chair of the American Psychology Association (APA) Division 10: Society for the Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts. (Letter).

Awards Committee Chair of the Research and Evaluation Network. For the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC).

Editorial board member. I have served as an editorial board member for two journals, which are the International Journal of Creativity and Problem Solving (Website) and the Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts (PACA Editorial).



Reviewer. I have served as a reviewer for the proposals that are submitted to the American Educational Research Association (AERA [Reviews]) conferences, for the American Psychology Association (APA [Reviews]) conferences, and for the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) conferences. In addition, I have also served as a reviewer for journals in the field of giftedness or creativity, which includes: Journal of Creative Behavior (Reviews), Journal of Secondary Gifted Education (Reviews), Creativity Research Journal (Reviews), Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts (Reviews), and Asia Pacific Education Review (Reviews).


Elected Student Representative. I provided service through a number of leadership roles including responsibilities as the Elected Student Representative for the AERA on
the Giftedness and Talent SIG (July, 2004 – June, 2006 [Newsletter]).


Advisory board member. I also served as an advisory board member (Letter) for the Ph.D. program in Applied Creativity and Innovation at Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA. I reviewed the new Ph.D. program, new course proposals (Proposal), and advised the staff on matters related to these issues.

Consultant. I have remained active in various professional organizations and have kept in close contact with my former university, the University of Georgia (UGA). Case in point, I serve as a consultant to the Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development (Torrance Center [Website]) at UGA. I have organized training sessions both domestically and internationally for creativity and its measurement through my contacts with the Torrance Center. I have trained teachers of gifted students on administering and scoring the Torrance Tests of Creativity Thinking and fostering students’ creativity (Website). I also served as a Judge for the State Individual/Team Problem Solving Competitions for the Future Problem Solving program for several years (Schedule). I have assisted many scholars and educators regarding creativity assessments and the Torrance Center’s work through e-mails, mailings, and phone calls from around the world (Letters). During one of my activities as a consultant for the Center, I organized several international training sessions. For each session, I was responsible for selecting the subjects and scheduling the presenter for each of the presentations. I also arranged for presentations by other researchers, teachers, and professors with expertise in the areas of creative or gifted education that were being covered. I scheduled the subjects to produce a logical flow of information, which optimized the training in general and incorporated previous groups’ evaluations of the subject matter. For each session, I made sure that the group would observe at least one elementary (Letter), one middle (Letter), and one high school (Letter). I worked with the school principals and other administrators for Barrow Elementary School in Athens, GA; Whitehead Road Elementary Schoolin Athens, GA; Burney Harris Lyons Middle School in Athens, GA; Clark Middle School in Athens, GA; Cedar Shoals High School in Athens, GA; and South Cobb High School Academy of Mathematics and Medical Sciences in Atlanta, GA to accommodate the school visits. This required notifying school administrators that a group of educators was interested in studying Giftedness and Creativity in American Schools, and that I wanted to arrange for training groups to visit their schools. In an effort to enliven the training sessions, I also arranged visits to Fort Discovery in Augusta, GA; Stone Mountain in Atlanta, GA; CNN in Atlanta, GA; Discovery Mall or Mall of Georgia in Atlanta, GA; Rock Eagle 4-H Center in Eatonton, GA; and other places of cultural interest and visited all of these places with each of the training groups. Examples of training schedules for August, 2005 (Schedule & Letters), June 2005 (Schedule), August 2006 (Schedule & Letters) can be accessed by clicking the links.

Besides supervising all of the training sessions, I also presented materials reagrding giftedness and creativity mostly based on my research findings. The following are examples of the titles for my presentations:

Kim, K. H. (2006). Dr. Torrance’s life and legacy. Kyungbuk Province Teachers Training in Creativity, The Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, August 13 –25, 2006.

Kim, K. H. (2006). What is creativity? Kyungbuk Province Teachers Training in Creativity, The Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, August 13 –25, 2006.

Kim, K. H. (2006). How can you measure creativity? Kyungbuk Province Teachers Training in Creativity, The Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, August 13 –25, 2006.

Kim, K. H. (2006). Who is creative? Kyungbuk Province Teachers Training in Creativity, The Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, August 13 –25, 2006.

Kim, K. H. (2006). Why are Asians less creative than Americans? Kyungbuk Province Teachers Training in Creativity, The Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, August 13 –25, 2006.
Kim, K. H. (2005). About Dr. Torrance. Junbook Province Teachers for Gifted Training, The Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development, Athens, GA, August 14 – 27, 2005.

Kim, K. H. (2005). Comparison between Asian and American education Junbook Province Teachers for Gifted Training, The Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, August 14 – 27, 2005.

Kim, K. H. (2005). Creativity and culture Junbook Province Teachers for Gifted Training, The Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, August 14 – 27, 2005.

Kim, K. H. (2005). Creativity and underachievement Junbook Province Teachers for Gifted Training, The Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, August 14 – 27, 2005.

Kim, K. H. (2005). The four Ps of creativity Junbook Province Teachers for Gifted Training, The Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, August 14 – 27, 2005.

Kim, K. H. (2005). The father of creativity: E. Paul Torrance. Kyungpook Province Teachers Training in Creativity, The Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, June 19 –July 1, 2005.

Kim, K. H. (2005). The interactions between culture and creativity. Kyungpook Province Teachers Training in Creativity, The Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, June 19 –July 1, 2005.

Kim, K. H. (2005). Is creativity related to underachievement? Kyungpook Province Teachers Training in Creativity, The Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, June 19 –July 1, 2005.

Kim, K. H. (2005). Creativity or diligence? Kyungpook Province Teachers Training in Creativity, The Torrance Center for Creativity and Talent Development, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, June 19 –July 1, 2005.

Additionally, I regularly consult with graduate students and researchers at other Universities in the U.S. (Letters) as well as in other countries (Letters) regarding creativity assessment, cultural influence on creativity, and Dr. Torrance’s work.


Service to the International Community
The Korean Department of Education invited me to train science teachers, teachers of gifted students, or gifted students in creativity in several major Korean cities during the summers of 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2008. These training sessions were very intense and continued for approximately ten hours each day. In addition, I have worked on developing an exchanging faculty program with several university professors in Korea (Letter). The followings are brief descriptions of the training sessions in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2008:

Kim, K. H. (2008, July [Schedule]). Creativity training for gifted students, Training for disadvantaged gifted and talented children living in rural poverty in Junbook Province. Junbook Department of Education, Imsil, Korea, July 10-17, 2008 (Letter).

Kim, K. H. (2006, August). TTCT Enrichment (Booklet) and Future Problem Solving Program (Booklet) Training, KyungBuk Science Education Institute, Pohang, Korea, August 3-8, 2006.

Kim, K. H. (2005, July [Schedule]). TTCT Enrichment and Future Problem Solving Program Training, KyungBuk National University, Daegu, Korea, August 20-23, 2005.

Kim, K. H. (2005, July [Schedule]). TTCT Enrichment and Future Problem Solving Program Training, JeonBuk National University, Jeonju, Korea, July 10-16, 2005.

Cramond, B., & Kim, K. H. (2004, July [Schedule]). What is creativity? Creativity Workshop for the Teachers (1,600 teachers) in Daegu City, Daegue Metropolitan Office of Education, July 20, 2004, Daegu, Korea.

Cramond, B., & Kim, K. H. (2004, July [Schedule]). TTCT Scoring Training. Creativity Workshop for the Teachers in Jeonju City, Jeonpook Metropolitan Office of Education, July 12-14, 2004, Jeonju, Korea.

Cramond, B., & Kim, K. H. (2004, July). How to encourage your students’ creativity. Creativity Workshop for the Teachers in Kyungpook State, Kyungpook Metropolitan Office of Education, July 21, 2004, Daegu, Korea.


During the Summer of 2006 and 2008, I was invited to give a lecture to six hundred teachers (seven hundred teachers for 2008) during their Continuing Education Certification Training at the Kongju National University in Korea, which was sponsored by the Korean Department of Education. At the end of their training, the teachers in attendance voted my presentation as the most informative and helpful of all presentations (Letter).
The followings are brief descriptions of the presentation sessions in 2006 and 2008:

Kim, K. H. (2008, July [Schedule]). What is Creativity? Seven Hundred Korean Teachers’ Continuing Education Certification Training (182 hours), Korea Department of Education, Kongju National University, Kongju, Korea, July 16-August 20, 2008.

Kim, K. H. (2006, August [Letter]). How to encourage creativity in your students. Six Hundred Korean Teachers’ Continuing Education Certification Training, Kongju National University, Kongju, Korea, August 10, 2006.


Also during the Summer of 2004 and 2006, while between two training sessions in different cities, I was invited by the Daejeon Gifted Institute (Korea) in 2006 and by the Daejeon Metropolitan Office of Education in 2004 to educate the parents of gifted children (Letter).
The followings are brief descriptions of the presentation sessions in 2004 and 2006:

Kim, K. H. (2006, August [Presentation]). How to encourage your child’s creativity. Parent Seminar August 2006, Daejeon Gifted Institute, Daejeon, Korea, August 9, 2006.

Kim, K. H. (2004, July). Who is creative? Characteristics of creative children. Creativity Workshop for Parent Education, Daejeon Metropolitan Office of Education, July 26, 2004, Youseong, Korea.

Working with Korean public schools. The Korea Foundation awarded a field research grant in May, 2008, for the purpose of studying the characteristics of underachieving students in Korea. As a consequenc, I had the opportunity to work with teachers and students in public, middle and high schools in Korea and was able to help many gifted students who had been unable to perform at their optimal academic ability level. The following is a brief description of the research:

Kim, K. H. (2008 [Letter]). The relationship between creativity and underachievement among Korean and American elementary and high school students.
Grant awarded from the Field Research Fellowship Program, The Korea Foundation. Awarded amount: $10,302.96.